And Jacob listened

28.7 “And Jacob listened to his father and his mother, and he went to Padan aram.”

RASHI: And Jacob listened: This is connected to the aforementioned topic: When Esau saw that Isaac had blessed [Jacob] and that he had sent him off to Padan-aram, and that Jacob listened to his father and went to Padan-aram, and that the daughters of Canaan were displeasing [to his father], then he, too, went to Ishmael.

YOCHANAN: And Jacob listened: But we are already told, that Isaac blindly listened to the deceptive words of Esav (25.28 see RASHI below) and in 28.5 Isaac sent Jacob so why does the Torah tell us “he went to Padan aram.” Because the narrative tells us Esau went to Ishmael to contrast their behavior!

Jacob went out of love for his parents, and out of love for his brother. He went, that is, he honored them BOTH. Jacob listened to his father’s command (you shall not take) and listened to the voice of his mother (flee to Laban my brother, etc.) AND he went voluntarily [given his choices, he could have stayed and trusted in HaShem for he too was 40 years old and so he decides out of respect for his parents’ wishes he goes on (on a long journey) to Padan-aram “to take a wife but also out of love for his brother; while Esau went to Ishmael (who dwelt nearby in the wilderness of Paran, on a short journey) only to impress Isaac!

25.28 “Now Isaac loved Esau, because he did eat of his venison; and Rebekah loved Jacob.” JPS

25.28 “And Isaac loved Esau because [his] game was in his mouth, but Rebecca loved Jacob.” Judaica Press

RASHI: in his mouth: As the Targum renders: into Isaac’s mouth. The Midrashic interpretation is: with Esau’s mouth, for he would entrap him and deceive him with his words. — [From Tanchuma, Toledoth 8]

RASHI: of Padan-Aram: Because there were two Arams, Aram-naharaim and Aram-zobah, it is called Padan [meaning“pair”], an expression of a pair of oxen, which in Aramaic is פַּדַּן תּוֹרִין. Others interpret “Padan-aram” as “the field of Aram,” because in Arabic, a field is called “fadan.”

28.5 “And Isaac sent Jacob, and he went to Padan aram, to Laban the son of Bethuel the Aramean, the brother of Rebecca, the mother of Jacob and Esau.

RASHI: the mother of Jacob and Esau: I do not know what this teaches us. [I.e., We already know from the narrative that Rebecca was their mother.]

YOCHANAN: of Jacob and Esau: This teaches us that Rivka, by Divine Inspiration saved both her sons (on the same day when she said “flee to my bother Laban!”) ; that by Divine Inspiration she was concerned for both her sons (she was their mother in the most telling of circumstances, in the face of death – sibling rivalries like Cain and Abel) when she told Ya’acov to “flee to my bother Laban!” (27.43)

27.42 “And Rebecca was told of the words of Esau, her elder son, and she sent and called Jacob, her younger son, and she said to him, “Behold, your brother Esau regrets [his relationship] to you [and wishes] to kill you.”

RASHI: And Rebecca was told of: She was told by Divine Inspiration what Esau was thinking in his heart. [From Gen. Rabbah 67:9]

27.45 “Until your brother’s rage subsides from you, and he forgets what you did to him, and I will send and bring you from there. Why should I be bereft of both of you on one day?” ”

RASHI: of both of you: If he rises up against you and you kill him, his sons will rise up and kill you. And the Divine Spirit poured itself upon her and she prophesied that they would die on the same day, as is delineated in the chapter entitled הַמְּקַנֵּא לְאִשְׁתּוֹ (Sotah 13a).

 

YOCHANAN: the mother of Jacob and Esau – because Rivkah set Ya’acov before Esav – the younger before the elder, the Torah is summing up the narrative, she is the mother of Ya’acov, first because she loved Ya’acov unconditionally (25.28) and second because she set the younger before the elder, therefore the Torah tells us, Rivkah, the mother of Jacob and [also of] Esau.

Genesis 25.28And Isaac loved Esau because [his] game was in his mouth, but Rebecca loved Jacob.

Genesis 27.45 “Until your brother’s rage subsides from you, and he forgets what you did to him, and I will send and bring you from there. Why should I be bereft of both of you on one day?”

From this latter verse you see that Rivkah was a mother to Esav and therefore the Torah tells us, Rivkah, the mother of …Esau.

28.8 “And Esau saw that the daughters of Canaan were displeasing to his father Isaac.” (But not to mother! From this you see that Esav had a communicative relationship with his father while he only entrusted his mother with his best clothes. That is, he only had a superficial relationship with his mother! (27.15) 15 “And Rebekah took the choicest garments of Esau her elder son, which were with her in the house, and put them upon Jacob her younger son.”

RASHI: which were with her in the house: But He [Esau] had many wives, [with whom to entrust his garments] and yet he entrusted them [his garments] with his mother?! He was well aware of their deeds, and he was suspicious of them. [From Gen. Rabbah 65:16]

But we are told from the narrative that the daughters of Canaan were displeasing in the eyes of Rivka (Rebecca as well as Jacob) and the text implies she put the idea of Jacob going to Padan-aram to take a wife into the mind of Isaac. See below Midrash Rabbah (Gen. Rabbah 67:11)

27.46 “And Rebecca said to Isaac, “I am disgusted with my life because of the daughters of Heth. If Jacob takes a wife of the daughters of Heth like these, from the daughters of the land, of what use is life to me?” 28.1 “And Isaac called Jacob and blessed him, and he commanded him and said to him, “You shall not take a wife of the daughters of Canaan.” ”


“And when Esau was forty years old, he took as his wife wife Judith (also known as Oholibamah) the daughter of Beeri the Hittite, and Basemath (also known as Adah) the daughter of Elon the Hittite. And they were a bitterness of spirit to Isaac and to Rebecca” (26:34-35).

RASHI: forty years old: Esau was compared to a swine, as it is said (Ps. 80:14): “The boar from the forest gnaws at it.” This swine, when it lies down, stretches out its hooves, as if to say, “See, I am a clean (kosher) animal.” So do these [the chiefs of Esau] rob and plunder and then pretend to be honorable. During the entire forty years, Esau kidnapped wives from their husbands and violated them. When he was forty years old, he said:“My father married at forty; I, too, will do the same.” [From Gen. Rabbah 65:1]

27.46 “And Rebecca said to Isaac, “I am disgusted with my life because of the daughters of Heth. If Jacob takes a wife of the daughters of Heth like these, from the daughters of the land, of what use is life to me?”

YOCHANAN: “of what use is life to me?” – better – “how [shall] I live?” (“Why should I live in constant contention concerning who shall inherit the land, my God-fearing children or their idolatrous children?”

“I am disgusted with my life….” – better – “with the way I am living because of the daughters of Heth.” 26.35 “And they were a vexation of the spirit to Isaac and to Rebecca.”

RASHI: a vexation of the spirit: Heb. מֹרַת רוּחַ, an expression of defiance of spirit הַמְרָאַתרוּחַ like (Deut. 9:24):“You have been rebellious מַמְרִים.” All their deeds were to provoke and to grieve. [From Targum Onkelos]

YOCHANAN: “All their deeds were to provoke and to grieve.” To provoke and grieve the Holy One and Rivka who waited on the guests [daughters of Cheth – daughters of terror] in the tent of Sarah.

RASHI: to Isaac and to Rebecca: for they [the Hittite daughters] worshipped idols. [From Midrash Tanchuma, Toledoth 8]

YOCHANAN: What was provocative and grieveous? “And when they came to Marah, they could not drink of the waters of Marah, for they were bitter. Therefore the name of it was called Marah. And the people murmured against Moses, saying: ‘What shall we drink?’

What shall we drink?‘ “The water is ours” – What did the daughters of Cheth say? “The land shall be ours!” and they contended with Rivka over the price of the water for she served sweet, that is “living water” to her guests while the “daughters of bitterness,” Marah served the bitter waters of rebellion against HaShem; that is, they committed idolatry and required that (Avodah Zarah) of their guests and that of their children!

Here, we see that bitterness מֹרַת is connected to deception, water and contention, or envy as in Joshua 9; and Proverbs “A heart at peace gives life to the body, but envy rots the bones.”
YOCHANAN: “but envy rots the bones.” 26.14 “And he had possessions of flocks, and possessions of herds, and a great household; and the Philistines envied him.”

RASHI: to Isaac and to Rebecca: for they [the Hittite daughters] worshipped idols. [From Midrash Tanchuma, Toledoth 8]

YOCHANAN: to Isaac and to Rebecca – we read that both Isaac and Rebecca prayed to HaShem – 25.21 And Isaac prayed to the Lord opposite his wife because she was barren, and the Lord accepted his prayer, and Rebecca his wife conceived.

two are better than one for great is their merit – Ecclesiastes 4:9

Midrash Rabbah (Gen. Rabbah67:11) –

When Rebekah prompted Jacob to flee to Haran, she told him (v. 45): “Let me not lose you both in one day!” The midrash comments that this was prophetic, for Jacob and Esau were buried on the same day (BT Sotah 13a; Gen. Rabbah [ed. Theodor-Albeck], Zav 21, 1223). The Torah states that in order to persuade Isaac to send Jacob to Paddan-aram (and thus save himself from Esau’s sword), Rebekah bound this up with Jacob’s marriage. She told Isaac (Gen. 27:46): “I am disgusted with my life because of the Hittite women. If Jacob marries a Hittite woman like these […] what good will life be to me?” The midrash relates that in order to persuade Isaac, Rebekah began to blow her nose and cast [the mucus] away [to say that they were as disgusting to her as the mucus that comes from one’s nose]. She said: “The Hittite women squabble with one another” (Gen. Rabbah 67:11). In the wake of what she said, Isaac summoned Jacob and warned him not to take a wife from the Canaanite women, not even from the daughters of Aner, Eshkol or Mamre. Jacob heeded his father and mother, and the exegetes apply to him Prov. 12:15: “But the wise man accepts advice” (Gen. Rabbah67:12).

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About johnmhummasti

Was the victim of Human Rights Abuses (e.g. Hummasti v Bell, 98-3651-JTC) while a patient in the custody of the US Attorney General and hospitalized under 18 USC 4241 through 4244, et seq.! Interests: Biblical Studies, Talmudic Studies, Dead Sea (Yam Melek [Sea of Kings Soferim]) Scrolls, Scribal (Stam Sofer) Traditions, Cantorial (Hazzan) Psalms (Tehillim). Illustrated Calligraphy (e.g. Ketuvim [Jewish Marriage Contracts], Poetry). Self Published Manuscripts and Screen Plays at yhummastiscribd web site:
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